Zhenyu (Arthur) Jia and Colleagues funded by USDA/CDFA

Congratulations!

The University of California, University of Florida’s Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, Texas A&M University, California State University, and the USDA – Agricultural Research Service’s National Clonal Germplasm Repository ‐ Tree Fruit & Nut Crops & Grapes, to develop strategies to increase marketable yield of pomegranate in California and Florida.

Awarded $885,801

Recent publications from Dr. Zhenyu (Arthur) Jia and colleagues

 

 

Postharvest Quality of Imported, Domestic, and Minimally Processed Pomegranate Fruit

 

 

 

Register of New Fruit and Nut Cultivars List 50

 

 

Boosting predictabilities of agronomic traits in rice using bivariate genomic selection

               

    

 

Inference of Chromosome-Length Haplotypes Using Genomic Data of Three or a Few More Single Gametes

High Levels of Oxidative Stress Create a Microenvironment That Significantly Decreases the Diversity of the Microbiota in Diabetic Chronic Wounds and Promotes Biofilm Formation

Manuela Martins-Green and colleagues recently published a paper in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology

Diabetics chronic wounds are characterized by high levels of oxidative stress (OS) and are often colonized by biofilm-forming bacteria that severely compromise healing and can result in amputation. However, little is known about the role of skin microbiota in wound healing and chronic wound development.

New interdisciplinary research from plant cell biologist Carolyn Rasmussen’s group

Rasmussen and colleagues discovered the protein called TANGLED1 performs this microtubule controlling function by binding microtubules together like glue. Their description of how TANGLED1 operates was published in the Journal of Cell Biology.

New interdisciplinary research published in the Journal of Cell Biology from Associate Professor and plant cell biologist Carolyn Rasmussen’s group describes how the plant protein TANGLED 1 is needed to accurately position the new cell wall that forms at the end of cell division. The authors combine live-cell imaging and in vitro analyses to better understand how TANGLED 1 binds to microtubules to position the new cell wall during cell division. First author Pablo Martinez was a Ford Fellow and is currently an HHMI Hana Gray postdoctoral fellow at UCLA. Undergraduates acknowledged in this project include Jocelyne Aranda (UCR), Sukhmani Sidhu (UCR) and Christoper Hoyt (Harvey Mudd/CEPCEB NSF REU).

Other undergraduates interested in research with Professor Rasmussen should check out our U-SPARC and CEPCEB NSF REU programs.

Read the UCR News report here

Atkinson and Walling Secure DARPA Grant Funding

Co-PIs Peter Atkinson and Linda Walling have received funding from DARPA to develop gene editing technology in whitefly for the benefit of agriculture. This 2 year grant will build on work from initially obtained seed money from the UCR Senate and RED.  Drs. Atkinson and Walling’s project also benefited from the assistance of several very talented UCR undergraduate students, including Simran Sandhu, Katie Buker, Halondra Zamora, and  Jonathan Calero.

The team’s attached photo is of a CRISPR-edited male whitefly with white eyes on the right and a wild type male on the left.  Mutations at the white locus were subsequently confirmed and these conformed to what one expects of NHEJ-mediated repair of dsDNA breaks at the gRNA target site.  This is the first demonstration of CRISPR technology in whitefly and, as far as the investigators know, the first example of any genetic modification in it by any technology.  The whitefly eggs are very small, less than 0.4 mm long, have thick eggshells and remain attached to the leaf.  PIs Atkinson and Walling have found a way to microinject the eggs while keeping the detached leaf alive on defined media.  By comparison, other insect eggs like Drosophila and mosquito are about 1mm long and are freestanding and so can be attached to tape for microinjection.

Congratulations to the Atkinson and Walling team!

Cutler and Ma Present Plenary Talks at 2019 ASPB Conference

IIGB/CEPCEB saw unprecedented participation at the ASPB’s Plant Biology 2019 Conference in San Jose, California! CEPCEB’s own Wenbo Ma was a major symposia organizer of this year’s conference and delivered two talks, “Plant Disease and Resistance Mechanisms Major Symposium Overview by Organizer” and “Trans-kingdom RNAi executed by Secondary Small RNAs confers disease resistance”

Sean Cutler also presented a Plenary Talk, “New Tools for Dynamically Maximizing Crop Productivity”). Other IIGB Faculty who presented talks included Linda Walling (“Nymph mortality: Whitefly resistance in the non-model plants cassava and alfalfa”),and Dawn Nagel (“Time of day regulation of heat stress related growth responses”). Additionally, Meng Chen’s Assistant Project Scientist Chan Yul Yoo presented a Lightning Talk (“A nucleus-to-plastid light signaling mechanism for initiating chloroplast biogenesis”) as did Carolyn Rasmussen’s graduate student Alison Mills (“Division Plane Orientation Defects Revealed by a Synthetic Double Mutant Phenotype”).

IIGB Shines at the 2019 ASPB Conference!

IIGB/CEPCEB saw unprecedented participation at the ASPB’s Plant Biology 2019 Conference in San Jose, California! CEPCEB’s own Wenbo Ma was a major symposia organizer of this year’s conference and delivered two talks, “Plant Disease and Resistance Mechanisms Major Symposium Overview by Organizer” and “Trans-kingdom RNAi executed by Secondary Small RNAs confers disease resistance”

Other faculty presenting talks included Sean Cutler (Plenary: “New Tools for Dynamically Maximizing Crop Productivity”), Linda Walling (“Nymph mortality: Whitefly resistance in the non-model plants cassava and alfalfa”), and Dawn Nagel (“Time of day regulation of heat stress related growth responses”). Additionally, Meng Chen’s Assistant Project Scientist Chan Yul Yoo presented a Lightning Talk (“A nucleus-to-plastid light signaling mechanism for initiating chloroplast biogenesis”) as did Carolyn Rasmussen’s graduate student Alison Mills (“Division Plane Orientation Defects Revealed by a Synthetic Double Mutant Phenotype”).

Aside from talks, 23 faculty, junior researchers, and students presented posters. These included:

Sonja Winte (Bailey-Serres Lab): “Group VII ERF orchestration of the hypoxia-responsive network in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, & maize“

Chan Yul Yoo (M. Chen Lab): “A nucleus-to-plastid light signaling mechanism for initiating chloroplast biogenesis“

Honghong Wu (Giraldo Lab): “Improving Arabidopsis salinity tolerance through cerium oxide nanoparticle scavenging of ROS and enhancing leaf mesophyll potassium retention“

Patrick Thomas (Walling Lab): “Elucidating a Nymph-Based Whitefly Resistance Mechanism in Alfalfa“  

Jacob MacWilliams (Kaloshian Lab): “A cowpea aphid salivary enzyme with dual roles in altering host immunity and physiology“  

Adam Steinbrenner (Close Lab): “Discovery of an immune receptor for a Herbivore-Associated Molecular Pattern (HAMP) to combat chewing“

Yingnan Hou (W. Ma Lab): “Plant secondary siRNAs contribute to host-induced gene silencing in oomycete pathogens“  

Cristal Zuniga Pena (Borneman Lab): “Unraveling metabolic interactions among ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Citrus sinensis“  

Alison Mills (Rasmussen Lab): “Division Plane Orientation Defects Revealed by a Synthetic Double Mutant Phenotype“

Marschal Bellinger (Rasmussen Lab): “Kinectin is essential for cell expansion in Zea mays

Carolyn Rasmussen, Assistant Professor: “Analyzing the role of cell shape in division plane orientation“  

Jin-Zheng Wang (Dehesh Lab): “How plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite regulates adaptive responses? “

Jaime Van Norman, Assistant Professor: “PLK1, a transmembrane receptor kinase, links lateral cell polarity with radial tissue patterning during root development“

Jessica Toth (Van Norman Lab):  “PLK3: A receptor-like kinase with lateral polar localization in root epidermal cells“

Brandon Le (X. Chen Lab) : “Dissecting the Roles of Plant-Specific RNA Polymerases IV and V in Soybean“

Emily Blair (Nagel Lab): “Contribution of time of day and the circadian clock to the heat stress responsive transcriptome in Arabidopsis“  

Alex Rajewski (Litt Lab): “Identification of Conserved Regulatory Modules in Dry and Fleshy Fruit Development“  

Ye Xu (X. Chen Lab) :  “Investigating the dynamic localization of Arabidopsis AGO1 between the nucleus, cytoplasm and the ER“

Tejasvinee Atul Mody (Nagel Lab): “Regulation of circadian clock genes by Heat Shock Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis“

Sassoum Lo (Close Lab): “Genetic analysis of pod shattering in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] “ 

Sun Hyun Chang (Nelson Lab): “Evolution of specific receptor-target interactions in karrikin and strigolactone signaling pathways“

Stephanie Martinez (Nelson Lab): “The molecular basis for enhanced responses to karrikins, a class of germination stimulants in smoke“  

Damaris Godinez-Vidal (Kaloshian Lab): “A Novel Approach to Develop Broad-Spectrum Resistance to Plant Parasitic Nematodes“

Several IIGB/CEPCEB researchers also qualified as ASPB Travel Grant Awardees. Jin-Zheng Wang (Dehesh Lab), Sassoum Lo (Close Lab), Irma Ortiz (Walling Lab), Alex Rajewski (Litt Lab), and Sonja Winte (Bailey-Serres Lab) all won $575 to attend the conference.

IIGB Shines at the 2019 ASPB Conference!

IIGB/CEPCEB saw unprecedented participation at the ASPB’s Plant Biology 2019 Conference in San Jose, California! CEPCEB’s own Wenbo Ma was a major symposia organizer of this year’s conference and delivered two talks, “Plant Disease and Resistance Mechanisms Major Symposium Overview by Organizer” and “Trans-kingdom RNAi executed by Secondary Small RNAs confers disease resistance”

Other faculty presenting talks included Sean Cutler (Plenary Talk: “New Tools for Dynamically Maximizing Crop Productivity”), Linda Walling (“Nymph mortality: Whitefly resistance in the non-model plants cassava and alfalfa”), and Dawn Nagel (“Time of day regulation of heat stress related growth responses”). Additionally, Meng Chen’s Assistant Project Scientist Chan Yul Yoo presented a Lightning Talk (“A nucleus-to-plastid light signaling mechanism for initiating chloroplast biogenesis”) as did Carolyn Rasmussen’s graduate student Alison Mills (“Division Plane Orientation Defects Revealed by a Synthetic Double Mutant Phenotype”).

Aside from talks, 23 faculty, junior researchers, and students presented posters. These included:

Sonja Winte (Bailey-Serres Lab): “Group VII ERF orchestration of the hypoxia-responsive network in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, & maize“

Chan Yul Yoo (M. Chen Lab): “A nucleus-to-plastid light signaling mechanism for initiating chloroplast biogenesis“

Honghong Wu (Giraldo Lab): “Improving Arabidopsis salinity tolerance through cerium oxide nanoparticle scavenging of ROS and enhancing leaf mesophyll potassium retention“

Patrick Thomas (Walling Lab): “Elucidating a Nymph-Based Whitefly Resistance Mechanism in Alfalfa“  

Jacob MacWilliams (Kaloshian Lab): “A cowpea aphid salivary enzyme with dual roles in altering host immunity and physiology“  

Adam Steinbrenner (Close Lab): “Discovery of an immune receptor for a Herbivore-Associated Molecular Pattern (HAMP) to combat chewing“

Yingnan Hou (W. Ma Lab): “Plant secondary siRNAs contribute to host-induced gene silencing in oomycete pathogens“  

Cristal Zuniga Pena (Borneman Lab): “Unraveling metabolic interactions among ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ and Citrus sinensis“  

Alison Mills (Rasmussen Lab): “Division Plane Orientation Defects Revealed by a Synthetic Double Mutant Phenotype“

Marschal Bellinger (Rasmussen Lab): “Kinectin is essential for cell expansion in Zea mays“

Carolyn Rasmussen, Assistant Professor: “Analyzing the role of cell shape in division plane orientation“  

Jin-Zheng Wang (Dehesh Lab): “How plastidial retrograde signaling metabolite regulates adaptive responses? “

Jaime Van Norman, Assistant Professor: “PLK1, a transmembrane receptor kinase, links lateral cell polarity with radial tissue patterning during root development“

Jessica Toth (Van Norman Lab):  “PLK3: A receptor-like kinase with lateral polar localization in root epidermal cells“

Brandon Le (X. Chen Lab) : “Dissecting the Roles of Plant-Specific RNA Polymerases IV and V in Soybean“

Emily Blair (Nagel Lab): “Contribution of time of day and the circadian clock to the heat stress responsive transcriptome in Arabidopsis“  

Alex Rajewski (Litt Lab): “Identification of Conserved Regulatory Modules in Dry and Fleshy Fruit Development“  

Ye Xu (X. Chen Lab) :  “Investigating the dynamic localization of Arabidopsis AGO1 between the nucleus, cytoplasm and the ER“

Tejasvinee Atul Mody (Nagel Lab): “Regulation of circadian clock genes by Heat Shock Transcription Factors in Arabidopsis“

Sassoum Lo (Close Lab): “Genetic analysis of pod shattering in cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp] “ 

Sun Hyun Chang (Nelson Lab): “Evolution of specific receptor-target interactions in karrikin and strigolactone signaling pathways“

Stephanie Martinez (Nelson Lab): “The molecular basis for enhanced responses to karrikins, a class of germination stimulants in smoke“  

Damaris Godinez-Vidal (Kaloshian Lab): “A Novel Approach to Develop Broad-Spectrum Resistance to Plant Parasitic Nematodes“

Several IIGB/CEPCEB researchers also qualified as ASPB Travel Grant Awardees. Jin-Zheng Wang (Dehesh Lab), Sassoum Lo (Close Lab), Irma Ortiz (Walling Lab), Alex Rajewski (Litt Lab), and Sonja Winte (Bailey-Serres Lab) all won $575 to attend the conference.